Furniture

  - A Fine George II Period Carved Mahogany Corner Chair

A Fine George II Period Carved Mahogany Corner Chair

English, circa 1755

£14,500

Height: 31 in (79 cm)
Width: 30 1/2 in (80 cm)
Depth: 27 in (69 cm)

The curved top rail finely carved with acanthus and outswept arms supported by three finely fluted columns and back splats pierced with a trellis design and carved with C scrolls and leaf work. The upholstered drop in seat covered with a contemporary silk over four chamfered legs with stretchers and corner brackets with similar pierced design and C scrolls.

Ref 875


  - A Rare George IV Amboyna and Ebony Side Cabinet

A Rare George IV Amboyna and Ebony Side Cabinet

English, circa 1825

£28,000

Height: 34 ¾ (89 cm)
Width: 60 ¼ in (153 cm)
Depth: 17 in (43 cm)

During the 17th century powerful trading companies, such as the British East India Company, and its Dutch Counterpart, the VOC were drawn to the islands of Southeast Asia; their pepper, nutmegs. cloves. gold, rare dye woods and other jungle produce, have for centuries attracted visitors from all over the world. The distinctive burr of Amboyna is native to Southeast Asia, with the specific geographical source rooted in Amboina, a tiny island famed at first in the western world as the source of cloves and other foreign rarities.

The port of Amboina was the departure point for ships trading with nearby Ceram, the Banda islands and the Moluccas, where mace and nutmeg were found. Therefore, despite its small size, Amboina had strategic, commercial and geographical significance for those involved in the spice trade. Amboina was initially under Portuguese control, before it was taken over by the Dutch in 1605, and for two decades the Dutch and English traded here side by side, until the Amboina massacre of 1623 when the english traders were executed, without warning by their Dutch rivals.

It is remarkable, therefore to consider the history and story of how this incredibly rare and expensive indigenous wood, travelled across the world to form this stunning English cabinet. These sea voyages were dangerous and specifically before the invention of steam engines, depended on wind, meaning the excursions were long and unpredictable. Furthermore, specific sea routes presented numerous challenges that delayed recovery of initial costs. This, combined with the rarity of the wood, made the burr exceptionally expensive and highly sought after.

The earliest reference to 'Amboina' wood in an english context occurs in the customs returns for 1730 and 1731, when a little over four hundred weight was imported by the East India Company. The valuation at about £1 per hundred weight before shipping and duty, made it slightly dearer than ebony, and considerably more expensive than rosewood.

Ref 865


  - A George II Satinwood Marquetry Giltwood and Composition demi-lune Side Table

A George II Satinwood Marquetry Giltwood and Composition demi-lune Side Table

English, circa 1780

£56,000

The semi elliptical top veneered in finely figured West Indian satinwood, cross banded in kingwood and tulipwood with a marquetry border of flowers and ribbons. The giltwood base with a frieze applied with paterae and husks tied with ribbons. The central oval tablet painted “en grisaille” on a dark blue background, depicting Ceres the Roman goddess of fertility and agriculture being tended to by her servants. The four turned and fluted legs headed by beads and acanthus leaves.


The central painted medallion depicts Ceres the Roman and Greek goddess of agriculture. Similar to Bacchus, she tends to be associated in the 18th century dining room. Ceres was the Roman Goddess of agriculture, grain and motherly love. She was the daughter of Saturn and Ops, the sister of Jupiter, and the mother of Proserpine.

Height: 33 ¼ in (84 cm)
Width: 48 ½ in (123 cm)
Depth: 23 ¾ in (60.5cm)

Provenance:
Robert Cunninghame Graham (1737-1797), either at Finlaystone House (sold 1862), Gartmore House (sold 1900) or Ardoch House and by descent to:
Lady Patricia Cunninghame Graham (on loan at Culzean Castle, 1982-2017).

This table was in the collection of the Cunninghame Graham family, and on loan to Culzean Castle between 1982-2017. It was probably originally acquired by Robert Cunninghame Graham, d. 1797, who was a well-known Scottish politician and poet. Interestingly, Robert is now remembered for a poem ‘If Doughty Deeds my Lady Please,’ which was later set to music by his great-great grandson and Sir Arthur Sullivan. Robert Graham inherited a number of estates throughout his life and twice changed his name in accordance with his inheritances. At his death he was enormously wealthy with estates located in Perthshire, Dunbartonshire, Renfrewshire, Lanarkshire, as well as owning a Jamaican plantation.

More recently, whilst belonging to Lady Patricia Cunninghame Graham, the table was on loan at to the National Trust for Scotland at Culzean Castle from 1982-2017.

Ref 891


  - A rare 19th Century Mahogany and Carved Gilt Centre Table

By Johan Augustus Kriemichen

A rare 19th Century Mahogany and Carved Gilt Centre Table By Johan Augustus Kriemichen

Leipzig, 1825

£38,000

The circular top veneered with segments of flame mahogany over a scalloped frieze with gilt bronze balls. The triform base with turned central support with carved and gilded feathers and acanthus leaves flanked by three giltwood cherubs, raised on lion paw feet.
Retaining an original label from Johan Augustus Kriemichen, at No.345 Haynstrausse, Leipzig.
The carved elements retaining their original gilding and the mahogany of untouched colour and patina.


Height: 30 in (76.5 cm)
Width: 40 in (101 cm)


Provenance:
The Counts Von Schönburg-Glauchau
at Hinterglauchau and Forderglauchau

The Counts Von Schönburg-Glauchau
at Hinterglauchau and Forderglauchau

The Counts Von Schönburg-Glauchau are one of the oldest aristocratic families of Europe and for several hundred years have appeared in the history of southwest Saxony, traceable back to the 12 th century. Their ancestral castles were erected at this time on a pre-existent fortification, and were later remodelled into a larger noble residence, Hinterglauchau. Forderglauchau was the built in the 15th century, as part of the same complex as Hinterglauchau.

The territory of Schönburg overlapped into Saxony, Bohemia and eventually Thuringia and all of it fell under the jurisdiction of the Holy Roman Empire of the German nation. Consequently, the Lords of Schönburg had different statuses according to their subsequent jurisdiction. However at his coronation, in 1790, Leopold II raised the status of the Waldenburg-Hartenstein to the status of princely House.

Over the centuries, several generations assembled their collections here, distinguished by a significant amount of commissions. The properties of various branches were confiscated in 1945 under the Communist Land reform of East Germany. At this time, Joachim, Count of Schönburg-Glauchau was the nominal successor. Soviet occupation troops arrested him, expropriated his property, and he and his family were deported. However, in 2011 the castles of Forderglauchau and Hinterglauchau were restituted to their rightful owners under the Compensation Act.


Count Alban Von Schonburg
And J.A Kriemichen, Leipzig

The Lordship and Castle of Wechselburg, where this table lived, was owned by the House of Schönburg from 1546 to 1945. It is documented that during the first quarter of the 19th century, many alterations were made to the interior of Wechselburg Castle with several purchases of furniture. Furthermore, records reveal that Count Alban von Schönburg, who inhabited the castle at this time made many purchases from Leipzig. Interestingly, the trade label attached to the table denotes its original location was in the workshop of Johan Augustus Kriemichen, at Haynstrasse No. 345, Leipzig. A photograph of his shop font can be seen below as well as the stamp from his workshop. His stamp translates:

Joh.Aug Kriemichen, Leipzig
“With a selection of fine solid mahogany pieces and sumptuous rooms and entire floors, you can fully enjoy the latest fashion at reasonable prices.
Haynstrausse No. 345, The Gold and Blue Star”

Ref 846


  - A George II Mahogany and Parcel Gilt Breakfront Secretaire Cabinet

Attributed to William Hallett

A George II Mahogany and Parcel Gilt Breakfront Secretaire Cabinet Attributed to William Hallett

English, circa 1740

Price available upon request

The cabinet surmounted by a broken pediment with central carved and gilded cartouche with pendants of fruit and flowers. The parcel gilded cornice, carved with Virtruvian scrolls, bead and reel and egg and dart moulding. The central mirrored door bordered by rosette and ribbon moulding with a bold egg and dart frame with concealed escutcheons enclosing adjustable shelves. The secretaire drawer below with parcel gilded guilloche moulding with rosette and ribbon, opening to reveal an arrangement of small drawers and pigeonholes. The lower section with double-hinged doors veneered in well-figured flame mahogany over a stepped plinth with parcel gilded flower and dart moulding.

Height: 92 in (235cm)
Width: 52 in (132cm)
Depth: 19 in (48cm)

The architectural form of this extraordinary mahogany breakfront cabinet is clearly inspired by the influential designer, William Kent (c. 1685-1748) and has distinct similarities to a group of similar bookcases, differing slightly in carved details and the inclusion of either mirrored, glazed or panelled elements. Here, the Palladian style and details of Virtruvian ribbon scroll, egg-and-dart, beaded reed string and flowered-ribbon guilloche derive from ‘chimney piece with over mantel’ patterns in Isaac Ware’s Designs of Inigo Jones and Others (1731).

The strong architectural design, overall Palladian form, the use of superior mahogany and the sharpness of the distinguished carving suggest that it is the work of the pre-eminent London cabinet-maker, William Hallett (1707-81). Hallett, who made furniture for George II, was one of the most fashionable makers of the second half of the 18th century. As a leading maker craftsman of his time, he pioneered the work of esteemed makers that followed, including William Vile, John Cobb and Thomas Chippendale. Based first in Great Newport Street and then St Martin’s Lane, London, he established himself as a great cabinet-maker, leaving an impressive body of work with an outstanding quality of carving and of sophisticated design.

A labelled cabinet by Hallett dated 1763 from the Colonel Norman Colville collection is illustrated in A. Coleridge, op. cit., pl. 69-71. A similar pair of cabinets also conforming to the Hallett’s style was formerly in the collection of HRH Princess Mary, Princess Royal and Countess Harewood. A similar one belonged to Mrs C. Bouverie-Pusey, formerly of Pusey House, Berkshire.


A mirror from Ragley Hall shares an almost identical cartouche, clearly by the same hand.









Ref 852


  - A George II Burr Walnut Parcel-Gilt and Gilt Bronze Mounted Bureau Bookcase

In the manner of Giles Grendey

A George II Burr Walnut Parcel-Gilt and Gilt Bronze Mounted Bureau Bookcase In the manner of Giles Grendey

English, circa 1740

Price available upon request

The broken arched pediment with mouldings of parcel gilding, centred by a carved gilt cartouche and flanked by finials over a mirrored door with shaped gilded mouldings opening to reveal and arrangement of drawers and pigeon holes with adjustable shelves. The well figured fall opening to reveal a shaped and fitted interior with shaped bombe drawers and a central mirrored door over four graduated drawers retaining their original handles and escutcheons, bordered by chased bronze corner mounts with gilt mouldings and raised upon ogee bracket feet.

Height: 96 ½ in (245 cm)
Width: 35 in (89 cm)
Depth: 24 ½ in (62 cm)

Provenance:
With Mallet, London in 1991

Literature:
L. Synge, Mallet’s Great Furniture, London, 1991, p. 50, fig. 44

This sumptuous bureau cabinet with its lower section of bombe form is attributed to the celebrated furniture maker Giles Grendey (1693-1780), whose premises were at St. Johns Square, Clerkenwell.

It is of particularly elaborate form combining burr walnut veneers inlaid with chequer banding with finely detailed water gilt gesso mouldings together with exceptionally fine quality gilt bronze mounts, handles and escutcheons.

Two related cabinets include an example with double-doors in its upper section which was formerly in the Hochschild collection (sold Sotheby’s, London 1 December 1978, lot 13, £300,000 including premium; also illustrated in Lanto Synge, Mallet’s Great English Furniture, London, 1991, p.49, pl. 43), and another with a single door which was formerly at Little Gidding Church, Huntingdonshire (sold anonymously Sotheby’s, London, 5 June 2007, lot 111, £240,000 including premium.)


Ref 836


  -  THE EARL OF HARDWICKE’S GILDED ARMCHAIRS

Attributed to John Linnell

THE EARL OF HARDWICKE’S GILDED ARMCHAIRS Attributed to John Linnell

English, circa 1770

£120,000

The upholstered back with serpentine top rail. The scrolling arms moulded and carved with husks and applied paterae. The gilt frames carved with fluting and beaded applied moulding over the four out swept legs, carved with stylised acanthus leaves.
These chairs retain the majority of their original gilding.

H: 39 ½ in (100 cm)
W: 26 in (66cm)
D: 28 in (71 cm)

Provenance:
Philip Yorke, 2nd Earl of Hardwicke, probably for 4 St James’s Square, London

Philip Yorke, (1720-1790) succeeded as second Earl of Hardwicke in 1764 and represented Reigate and Cambridgeshire in the House of Commons as well as serving as Lord Lieutenant of Cambridgeshire. He married Lady Jemima Campbell, daughter of the 3rd Earl of Breadalbane, granddaughter and Heiress of Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Kent. She succeeded as Marchioness Grey in 1722.

The Earl owned multiple properties, including Wimpole Hall, Cambridgeshire; Wrest Park, Bedfordshire and a townhouse at no.4 St James’s Square, London. Interestingly, at this time, when pieces of furniture were commissioned for country houses, they would have been transported by cart for delivery and therefore would have been secured to batons screwed to the rails. These chairs have no baton holes underneath and therefore are most likely to have been designed specifically for the Earl for his London home at St James’s Square.

Sir William Chambers and John Linnell

It is documented that Sir William Chambers wrote to the Earl of Hardwicke in 1767, and visited his London house the same year. Chambers also worked with Yorke at Wrest Park, however it is likely that the pair was designed specifically for the London Town House.
Chambers’ relationship with Linnell is not particularly well documented, however, a close connection between the two men can be linked between Linnell’s employment of two Swedish cabinet-makers at his Berkeley Square workshop in 1767/8; Georg Haupt and his brother-in-law, Christopher Furlohg. Chambers was indeed familiar with a table produced by the Swedes that came from Linnell’s workshop at this time and may have also been responsible for the introduction of the two men to Linnell himself. Furthermore, the Linnell workshop produced some furniture of Kentian inspiration, notably chairs, of a type, which Chambers is known to have admired.

Ref 834


  - A Rare George II Carved Giltwood Mirror

A Rare George II Carved Giltwood Mirror

English, circa 1735

£48,000

The swan neck pediment with rosettes and acanthus, centered by a cartouche, carved with scrolls and acanthus and surmounted by a stylised anthemion. The frieze centered by an entwined floral and wheat sheaf filled cornucopia with foliate triglyph capitals with an egg and dart moulding. The original bevelled plate bordered by a moulding, strap work and cornered with scallop shells with pendant husks of oak leaves. The apron similarly carved with foliage and centered by a scallop shell, with two brass candle handles.

Height: 69 1/4 in (176 cm)
Width: 34 1/4 in (87 cm)

This magnificent early mirror is a rare survival as it not only retains its original gilding but also its original Vauxhall bevelled plate.

This mirror has close stylistic links to one commissioned by George Bowes for either Streatlam Castles or Gibside County Durham, sold Christies New York 27th October, property of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, lot 73, $221,000.

See also 'Dictionary of English Furniture,' page 333 fig 56, Property of the Victoria & Albert Musuem.

Ref 859


  - A Fine Regency Period Burr Yew Wood Circular Centre Table

A Fine Regency Period Burr Yew Wood Circular Centre Table

English, circa 1820

£32,000

Ref 835


  - A Fine Pair of George III Carved Mahogany Armchairs of Exceptional Colour and Patination

A Fine Pair of George III Carved Mahogany Armchairs of Exceptional Colour and Patination

English, circa 1765

£78,000

Ref 797


  - A Fine George II Period White Painted and Gilt Console Table 
with Breccia Marble Top

A Fine George II Period White Painted and Gilt Console Table with Breccia Marble Top

English, circa 1740

Price available upon request

Ref 813


  - A rare George II Period walnut and burr walnut veneered breakfront cabinet on stand in the manner of Giles Grendey

A rare George II Period walnut and burr walnut veneered breakfront cabinet on stand in the manner of Giles Grendey

English, circa 1740

Price available upon request

Ref 796


  - A rare Regency period painted and gilded circular bookcase with Chinese lacquer panels

A rare Regency period painted and gilded circular bookcase with Chinese lacquer panels

English, circa 1810

£135,000

Ref 748


  - A Rare George II Mahogany Double Chairback Settee

A Rare George II Mahogany Double Chairback Settee

English, circa 1755

£68,000

The double chair back carved with interlocking C scrolls headed by a stylised pierced shell and flanked by acanthus scrolls.
The outswept arms with finely carved scrolled terminals. The three front cabriole legs carved with cabochons and acanthus leaves with ball and claw feet. The upholstered drop in seat covered in a period linen.

This exceptional settee is remarkable for its strength of design, quality of mahogany and fineness to the carving. It also is particularly rare to find such an example in such an untouched state, retaining a glorious patina throughout.

Height: 3ft 5 ¼ in (105 cm)
Width: 4 ft 8 ¾ in (144 cm)
Depth: 2ft 1 1/2 in (65 cm)

Ref 870


  - The Trinity College Mahogany Reading Tables
Probably made by Richard Shepherd

The Trinity College Mahogany Reading Tables Probably made by Richard Shepherd

English, circa 1755

£38,000

Height: 36 in (92 cm)
Width: 29 1/4 in (74 cm)
Depth: 24 in (61 cm)

This pair of George II Period mahogany reading tables have an exceptionally interesting history, having recently been de-acquisitioned from the Old Library at Trinity College, Oxford.

They have survived in remarkable condition and have retained a glorious colour and patina throughout.

The Old Library was built in 1417 and completed in 1421, as the library room of Durham College (the Oxford House of the Benedictine monks of Durham Cathedral Priory). Then, the buildings included a hall, a chapel and bedrooms, as well as the library, which is now the only surviving building of that group.

Trinity College was later founded, on these grounds, by Sir Thomas Pope in 1555, although no new buildings were built. Pope, a devout Catholic from a family of small landowners in Oxfordshire trained as a lawyer and very quickly raised his status under Henry VIII. He later became Treasurer of Augmentations and handled the estates of dissolved monasteries due to the Reformation.

Interestingly, there are also several identical pairs, which were part of the original furnishings for the Codrington Library, All Souls College, Oxford. Many of these tables are still in situ and were specifically made for the Codrington Library in 1756, supplied by Richard Shepherd of St Clements, Oxford, who was paid 8 guineas for four mahogany desks. The Codrington Library, All Souls, also has an exceptionally interesting history, having been designed by Nicholas Hawksmoor in 1751. Hawksmoor made his name specifically with church and university architecture, and many consider his contribution to All Soul's College his finest university work.

It is possible that these tables were originally made for the Codrington Library and perhaps gifted to the Old Library at Trinity in the last hundred years.

Ref 876


  - A George III period mahogany serpentine commode 
Attributed to Henry Hill of Marlborough

A George III period mahogany serpentine commode Attributed to Henry Hill of Marlborough

English, circa 1770

£85,000

Ref 784


  - A rare mahogany hall stool

A rare mahogany hall stool

In the manner of John Linnell

English, circa 1770

£9,500

Ref 783


  - A Fine George III Period Fiddleback Sycamore and Marquetry Dressing Table 

In the Manner of Mayhew and Ince

A Fine George III Period Fiddleback Sycamore and Marquetry Dressing Table In the Manner of Mayhew and Ince

English, circa 1780

£22,000

Ref 744


  - A rare George II giltwood architectural mirror

A rare George II giltwood architectural mirror

English, circa 1735

Price available on request

Ref 647


  - A rare George II period carved mahogany armchair

A rare George II period carved mahogany armchair

After a design by Thomas Chippendale

English, circa 1755

£85,000

Ref 707


  - A rare Irish carved mahogany console table with marble top

A rare Irish carved mahogany console table with marble top

Irish, circa 1760

£65,000

Ref 719


  - An Exceptional Pair of George III Marquetry Bombe Commodes

Attributed to Mayhew and Ince

An Exceptional Pair of George III Marquetry Bombe Commodes Attributed to Mayhew and Ince

English circa 1770

Price available upon request

Ref 704


  - A fine pair of George III period mahogany demi-lune card tables of excellent colour and patina

A fine pair of George III period mahogany demi-lune card tables of excellent colour and patina

English, circa 1780

£34,000

Ref 679


  - A fine George III giltwood mirror

A fine George III giltwood mirror

In the manner of Matthias Lock

English, circa 1750

£48,000

Ref 678


  - An outstanding pair of Regency period carved oak armchairs

An outstanding pair of Regency period carved oak armchairs

English, circa 1820

£58,000

Ref 576


  - An exceptional George II period carved mahogany serving table with Breccia Rosato marble top

An exceptional George II period carved mahogany serving table with Breccia Rosato marble top

English, circa 1755

Price available upon request

Ref 530


  - A Regency period bronze-mounted mahogany side cabinet

A Regency period bronze-mounted mahogany side cabinet

English, circa 1820

£42,000

Ref 362


  - A Regency period ebony-inlaid pollard oak writing table of wonderful untouched colour and patination

A Regency period ebony-inlaid pollard oak writing table of wonderful untouched colour and patination

English, circa 1810

Ref 190


  - A Fine George II Period Giltwood Oval Mirror

A Fine George II Period Giltwood Oval Mirror

English, circa 1760

£36,000

Height: 54 in (137 cm)
Width: 32 in (81 cm)

The oval frame with gadrooned border with C scrolls and acanthus. Surmounted by a cartouche of foliage, scrolls and acanthus.

The design of this mirror closely relates to a drawing by Thomas Chippendale, dated 1760 and published in his Gentlemen and Cabinet Makers Director, Thur edition of 1762.

Ref ref838


  - A Pair of George III Bedside Cabinets

A Pair of George III Bedside Cabinets

English, circa 1795

£22,000

A pair of George III bow front bedside cupboards executed in well figured mahogany of excellent colour, the tops with solid galleries with cut outs for lifting, the doors inlaid with box stringing and fitted with drop brass handles, the sides banded with cane work centres, all raised on square tapering legs with inlaid stringing.

Height: 31 1/2 in (80 cm)
Width: 15 1/4 in (40 cm)
Depth: 14 1/2 in (37 cm)

Ref 886



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