Cabinets

  - An Exceptional George I Period Scarlet Japanned Double Domed Bureau Cabinet

An Exceptional George I Period Scarlet Japanned Double Domed Bureau Cabinet

Attributed to John Belchier

English, circa 1720

Price available upon request

The cabinet lavishly decorated overall in scarlet and gilt with scenes of figures, foliage and birds mounted on the cornice with carved silver gilt finials; the two arched mirrored doors opening to reveal a finely fitted interior with a series of pigeonholes; folio sides and arched doors flanked by columns over small drawers; the bureau with a fall opening to reveal a similar arrangement of columns, drawers and pigeonholes and a sliding well; the exterior fitted with two short and long drawers and raised upon bun feet.

Height: 94 ½ in (240 cm)
Width: 41 1/3 in (105 cm)
Depth: 23 ¾ in (58 cm)

Literature:
Adam Bowett, Early Georgian Furniture 1715-1740

This magnificent cabinet is similar to the scarlet japanned bureau cabinet supplied for john Meller at Erddig in Northern Wales, now owned by the National Trust. The Erddid example is believed to have been supplied by John Belchier in 1720. John Belchier traded at the sign of ‘The Sun’ on the South side of St Paul’s churchyard, London. This address was first recorded in 1712 and from 1720 he is recorded supplying furniture to Erddig.

Provenance:
From the estate of Margot Irene Duke, Marchioness of Reading

Margot Irene Duke, Marchioness of Reading (1919 – 2015) was a British aristocrat and campaigner. An eccentric and spirited woman, she defied the usual traditions of aristocracy and was outspoken and controversial on many social, cultural and political issues, which she often expressed in trenchant letters to the Spectator. A noted beauty of the 1930s and 1940s, she sat for a number of leading photographers and featured as the cover of Pond’s face cream. She was also a pioneering pilot and racing driver, and was one of the first British women to gain a driving licence before the war.

Born on 11th January 1919, Margot was one of three daughters of Percival Augustus Duke and Violet Mappin, of the jeweller and silversmith dynasty, Mappin and Webb. Her father, Percival was noted as the last man to wear a winged collar on the floor of the Stock Exchange. Margot was also a descendant, through her father’s side of the Duke Biddle Trent Semans family based in New York. Benjamin N. Duke and his brother James were chairmen of the American Tobacco Company; had factories in both the textile and energy industries and made major contributions to the economic growth of the North Carolina economy, where their power facilities had expanded in the early 20th Century. Furthermore, researching her family in later life, Margot was able to trace her linage back to William the Conqueror. In 1940 she married Michael Viscount Erleigh, MS, the eldest son of the 2nd Marquis of Reading who would succeed his father in 1960.

The Marchioness loved speed, in the air and on land. As well as becoming one of the first British women to get a pilot’s licence before the war, she also competed in the 1952 Round Britain car rally as co-driver with Sheila Van Damm. Her neighbour and great friend Donald Campbell, the British speed record breaker who broke eight world records on water and on land in the 1950’s and 1960’s, used to encourage her to race and to go fast. Margot was adventurous and according to her daughter, Lady Jacky Isaacs, ‘a bit of a daredevil.’

She took an outspoken position on a number of social issues. During the World Cup in 1998, she wrote to the Spectator in support of English football hooligans and their behaviour in France. The Marchioness wrote, “We are a nation of yobs…I don’t agree with broken glass and knives…but to fight with his fists is a good clean fight.” She felt they had spirit, and she admired anyone with spirit. In the 1960’s she briefly entertained hopes of standing for the Conservatives in the general election, until her husband dissuaded her, fearing what she might say.

Margot was a keen animal rights activist and animal lover. She had many dogs throughout her life and enjoyed calling them eccentric and unusual names, including Pardon, Help, and even Toilet amongst others. Harold Brooks Baker, the former director of Brooks Peerage expressed that she had views, ‘diametrically opposed to most sane people.’ On the BBC 4 Radio Show, Last Word, Margot’s daughter Lady Jackie expressed that her mother would have been rather pleased with that description.






Ref 822


  - A Fine George II Period Burr Yew Wood Veneered Bureau Bookcase

A Fine George II Period Burr Yew Wood Veneered Bureau Bookcase

English, circa 1740

£28,000

Ref 803


  - A rare George II Period walnut and burr walnut veneered breakfront cabinet on stand in the manner of Giles Grendey

A rare George II Period walnut and burr walnut veneered breakfront cabinet on stand in the manner of Giles Grendey

English, circa 1740

Price available upon request

Ref 796


  - A rare George III period satinwood and ebony side cabinet with inset panels of Chinese lacquer

The Marquess of Anglesey's lacquer cabinet

A rare George III period satinwood and ebony side cabinet with inset panels of Chinese lacquer


English, circa 1790

The top with rounded corners banded in satinwood and ebony with a central panel veneered in Chinese lacquer with a scene of a palace within a landscape; the frieze similarly banded and inlaid over two doors with lacquer panels depicting a palace surrounded by trees and rocks by the waterside and opening to reveal adjustable shelves, the sides similarly decorated; the turned columns decorated gold English japanning in gold raised on turned feet

Height: 36 in (91.5cm)
Width: 43 ¼ in (110cm)
Depth: 15 ¾ in (40cm)

Provenance:
The Marquess of Anglesey, Plas Newydd, Anglesey
Thence by descent to Lord Rupert Paget

Plas Newydd (New Place or New Mansion) sits on the edge of the Menai Strait, on the island of Anglesey. It is a beautiful mansion set amongst stunning gardens and parkland and that was greatly altered by architect James Wyatt in the late 18th century. He refaced it and blended the towers into the front of the building and made it to look the way it still stands today.

In 1812, the estate passed to Henry William Paget, whose father had changed his surname from Bayly to Paget. Henry William was created the first Marquess of Anglesey in 1815 for his heroism at the Battle of Waterloo, where he lost a leg.

Henry, Lord Paget (1768-1854) took over Plas Newydd on his father’s death in 1812. This remarkable soldier was considered le plus beau garcon d’Angleterre and never lost his looks. He was described as ‘A tall, well-made man; wild, martial face, high forehead, with a large hawk’s nose, which makes a small, deep angle where it joins the forehead. A great deal of ease in his manners’. He entered parliament at 22, and at 25 he embarked on what was to become an extremely successful career within the army. After Napoleon’s escape from Elba in 1815, Uxbridge (as he was then called) was appointed commander of the Allied cavalry in the Netherlands (second in command to Wellington). His brilliant, if impetuous, handling of the cavalry at the battle of Waterloo on 18th June 1815, earned him lasting renown. His right leg was smashed by grapeshot as he was riding off the field with the Duke at the end of the day. Looking down at his shattered limb, he is supposed to have exclaimed: ‘By God, sir, I’ve lost a leg!’ To which the Duke, momentarily removing the spy-glass from his eye, replied: ‘By God, sir, so you have! – at once resuming his scrutiny of the retreating French. Within three weeks of the amputation of his limb, he was back in London. The Prince Regent (later George IV) at once made him the Marquess of Anglesey, declaring ‘that he loved him… and that he was his best officer and his best subject’.

Some years later Anglesey was provided with an early example of the recently invented articulated wooden leg. The same type, known as the Anglesey leg, was still being commercially advertised as late as 1914. One of those worn by Anglesey is maintained in working condition at Plas Newydd.

However, having lost a limb did not in any way slow him down. He was married twice, first Caroline Villiers with whom he had eight children, and then with Charlotte Wellesley (nee Cadogan) with whom he sired further ten. Charlotte Wellesley was married to the Duke of Wellington’s younger brother at the time she met Henry Paget and after a celebrated elopement they were finally married in 1810 after costly a divorce from his first wife.

In 1817 a column was erected within sight of Plas Newydd by in the inhabitants of Anglesey and Caernarfon ‘in grateful commemoration of the distinguished military achievements of the countryman’. This column was crowned with a colossal bronze statue of the Marquess in 1860.

Ref 782


  - A rare Regency period painted and gilded circular bookcase with Chinese lacquer panels

A rare Regency period painted and gilded circular bookcase with Chinese lacquer panels

English, circa 1810

£135,000

Ref 748


  - A George III period mahogany serpentine commode 
Attributed to Henry Hill of Marlborough

A George III period mahogany serpentine commode Attributed to Henry Hill of Marlborough

English, circa 1770

£98,000

Ref 784


  - A rare William and Mary period japanned cabinet on chest

A rare William and Mary period japanned cabinet on chest

English, circa 1690

£120,000

Ref 762


  - An Exceptional Pair of George III Marquetry Bombe Commodes

Attributed to Mayhew and Ince

An Exceptional Pair of George III Marquetry Bombe Commodes Attributed to Mayhew and Ince

English circa 1770

Price available upon request

Ref 704


  - An outstanding George III period carved mahogany cupboard

An outstanding George III period carved mahogany cupboard

Attributed to Gillows of Lancaster

English, circa 1770

£68,000

Ref 670


  - A Regency period bronze-mounted mahogany side cabinet

A Regency period bronze-mounted mahogany side cabinet

English, circa 1820

£42,000

Ref 362



My Portfolio